Many courthouses are historic buildings and all are free for the public to visit where you can learn first-hand about the tradition and purpose of the judicial process. 

Why Visit Us

Why Visit Us

Most people associate a visit to a court building with attendance at a court case - as a litigant, a witness, a juror, or a victim - but courthouses are worth visiting for varied reasons.

You can learn how our courts work, and watch legal practitioners in action. 

You can also appreciate the important coribution that court buildings make to the hertage of our country - from the majesty of 18th century architecture to impressive 21st century facilities.

Find Us

Find Us

Originally built as civic destinations and social hubs court houses are normally located centrally, in major towns, making accessibility easy for all members of the public.

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Group Visits

Group Visits

Large groups should contact their local court office before visiting. School groups can visit the Criminal Courts of Justice (CCJ) in Dublin and even carry out mock trials.

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Accessibility

Accessibility

You can visit court buildings around the country when the courts are sitting. You are welcome to go into most courtrooms to observe cases, but visitors with mobility issues should contact the court in advance, as some buildings may have accessibility issues.

 

Courtroom Etiquette

Courtroom Etiquette

Courtrooms are formal places and there is an expectation that you will behave in a respectful manner. Everyone in court, including witnesses, defendants and the public, must conduct themselves accordingly.  You cannot use mobile phones and you should not attempt to communicate with anyone involved in the case, including jurors.

For the privacy and protection of people attending court, you may not take photographs or video, or record proceedings in any way.